HOW NOT TO GO DOWN A CREATIVE DEAD-END

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I’m constantly thinking about how to be more creative, more inspired how to communicate ideas clearly. It’s not always easy. We have boundaries, financial limits, client preferences, what our audience will accept, and what they won’t. I came accross this site that inspired me to write about this. Have a look: http://www.youtube.com/user/Ogilvy

I think that’s the right approach. Struggle is part of the creative process. We try to present ourselves as creative and full of ideas.  But in the end, it’s always a struggle with myself and I admit it. Is this interesting what I’m producing, is it relevant? Am I doing it for the money or just for pleasing my clients? I think it’s from everything a bit.

We are afraid of failing, of making mistakes. But only our mistakes guide us to where we want to see ourselves. I want to break out of this fear. I have the drive for doing this, but do I have the guts?

I see so much on the web, other people’s work, and am impressed. I want to do these things. Do what everybody is inspired by. What’s your view is on creativity? Are you struggling? How do you get inspired? What makes a person creative? 

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I just translated parts of a book about a furniture designer Wharton Esherick who made interior designs. That inspired me tremendously. His art work is influenced by the anthroposophical movement, and he drew most of his inspiration out of that. It reminds me that I learned to look into other fields beyond just my own, and totransfer ideas and concepts into my own creativity rather then looking always to the work of other filmmakers.

What do you think of all this? The more  we discuss the more we can learn from each other.  Write your opinion in the comments below.

BTW, I really really appreciate that you’re here with us and sharing your stuff with us.

S.

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6 Responses to "HOW NOT TO GO DOWN A CREATIVE DEAD-END"

  1. Aryeh Sobel says:

    Hey Shmuel,

    Love your stuff.

    I just read an interesting comment by writer Malcolm Gladwell, author of “The Tipping Point”. When he was asked how he came up with story ideas, he replied (I’m paraphrasing) sometimes I have an idea for one story, which I think is mediocre, and sometimes I get another idea for a different story which I think is mediocre, but when I combine them together, they make one great story.

  2. Hey Aryeh. Thank for stopping by here. Yes, I think you might be right about Gladwell. Still, you need to find these two mediocre ideas. How do you get inspired?

  3. Aryeh Sobel says:

    Wow, it’s difficult. And I think the Ogilvy post is true, struggle.

    One of the best answers is to approach a problem specifically from a thematic perspective. It’s hard to generate ideas withuout a starting point, it’s like working in a vaccume. But if you can define a clear cut theme when you are working on something , than every decision that you make is validated or invalidated by the simple litmus test — does this fit my theme, and ideas can be further generated to expound on that theme.

    From a filmmaking perspective there is always the screenwriter’s dictum,” show don’t tell”– Don’t express anything via dialogue that can be shown visually. And the act of trying to craft an idea visually can be a challenging and creative way of telling a story that’s different from other people who are simply content with stating it.

    Of course, if you are really desperate (like I can be) sometimes just copying something else that you like until it’s been worked so much that you can make it your own can be effective (I cowrote a piece for Aish.com that was inspired by your “I Am” piece, and yet, in the end, it’s very different).

    Anyway, much hatzlacha!

    I can’t wait to see your next piece! (And I’m digging the steadycam!)

    Aryeh

  4. Aryeh,

    well said. I think the starting point is super important. It gives direction, its the first steps. Another approach is creating a kind of system, that restricts you from being to free and being locked into freedom. If you look at great work or art its always connected to a tremendous limitation. Wether its money, body limitations, time limitations or equipment limitations. I love working within restrictions and trying to define the boundaries, and overcome them in a creative way.
    Lars von Trier, danish filmmaker is a master of this. Check out his work Dogville, or ‘Dancer in the Dark’. The whole concept of the danish Dogma film movement is all about this.

  5. Passion seems to be the best starting point for me. Things that I am passionate about are easier to paint. Ideas just seem to flow from the heart rather than my head. Most people are moved by passion as it has a greater impact on our souls.

    • Yes, I think you need to be in touch with your left hemisphere in order to make creative connections. and its the correlation between thought and emotion. Passion is the emotional response to a thought that I deeply care about.
      The question often is how do we get to passion? What are the vehicles? What are the methods?

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